Mill House, Lincoln

Burflex House, Clay Street, Hull, East Yorkshire, HU8 8HA E. info@burflex.co.uk

Burflex House, Clay Street, Hull, East Yorkshire, HU8 8HA E. info@burflex.co.uk

MILL HOUSE, LINCOLN

Scaffolding in Lincoln, Mill House

Brayford Waterfront in Lincoln is the oldest inland harbour to be found in England, which is why we’re so proud here at Burflex to have been a part of the recent £20 million development that saw 69 luxury apartments and three new restaurants built at the site of former office building Mill House… with our scaffolding systems lending a helping hand, of course!

One The Brayford, as the residential and commercial development is now known as, was completed in June 2017, situated on Brayford Wharf – a part of Lincoln chockfull of busy shops, restaurants and bars.

This is actually the first residential development of its kind in the city for more than nine years, enabling people to enjoy the benefits of living in the city centre as well as stunning views of the Brayford Pool, the city to the south and the cathedral and castle to the north.

Lindum Construction hired the Burflex team to help them get the job off the ground, with managing director Simon Gregory saying when work on the site first began: “Having worked on a number of developments around the Brayford area, including Grantavon House, the Art & Design Faculty for University of Lincoln, Wagamamas and the Glass Mill building, Mill House has as many logistical challenges as all the others put together and it is certainly testing the grey matter.

“We have a great Lindum Team and we are trying to place as much work locally as possible. From a Lincoln City perspective it is great to see so many tower cranes in action.”

The waterfront itself was once one of the busiest in England but the demise of the wool trade saw its fortunes change. However, it enjoyed a revival in the 18th and 19th centuries when trading took centre stage once again, with the Brayford Pool serving as an important inland port.

The advent of road and rail spelled the end for the city’s lucrative barge cargoes, so the area fell into decline once again, with businesses closing and the water littered with derelict sinking barges. Fast forward to the 70s and the establishment of the Brayford Trust, and restoration of the Pool began, first serving as a marina for pleasure boats.

Now, the vibrant waterfront has a huge selection of eating, drinking and entertainment venues, with boat trips on the water taking place between Easter and October.