The Invention That Transformed Scaffolding

Burflex House, Clay Street, Hull, East Yorkshire, HU8 8HA E. info@burflex.co.uk

Burflex House, Clay Street, Hull, East Yorkshire, HU8 8HA E. info@burflex.co.uk

The Invention That Transformed Scaffolding

The Invention That Transformed Scaffolding

Scaffolding as a construction aid has existed since the dawn of art itself.

At Lascaux, an ancient network of cave paintings that is at least 17,000 years old, it is believed that scaffolding was interlocked into parts of the cave itself to allow early palaeolithic painters to paint on the ceiling.

For most of human civilisation, scaffolding was set up in largely the same way. Wood and bamboo poles that were tied together using rope were known to be used in Ancient Greece, Egypt, China and Nubia.

However, just over a century ago, a revolution was created that transformed scaffolding and the construction world as we know it forever.

David Palmer-Jones, working for the Rapid Scaffold Tie Company, created a revolutionary new device known as the Scaffixer (later patented as the Universal Coupler), that was famously used in the scaffolding erected around Buckingham Palace.

The residence of King George V had required major reconstruction and Mr Palmer-Jones used his “scaffixer” to allow for faster, safer and more robust scaffolding construction, and it became incredibly famous as a result.

The universal coupler is still used to this day as standard in the industry, even a century after its original, famous invention.

This has been assisted by the development of standardised water pipes that form the scaffold framework as well as the development of diagonal bracing, both of which were used to great effect after the Second World War ended in 1945.

The use of stronger materials and a universal standard meant that ever taller scaffolding could be erected, allowing for the grand skyscrapers we see today.

For more information about how scaffolders in Hull could help you, get in touch today.